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Why are planned giving newsletters getting less response?

the planned giving newsletter is a tactic - you need strategy

After 20 years of being in business, people are still asking why we do not offer planned giving newsletters as part of our services.

One reason is that an effective planned giving newsletter is only a tactic. It should be part of a series, and doing it right is extremely cost prohibitive.

Other Reasons

Marketing Noise

Every day the average prospect is inundated with over 3,000 marketing messages. In a large city, it’s over 5,000. A battle is being fought for the eyes and ears of the world, and in most cases the enemy is an overstuffed mailbox.

Not only is your mail from your nonprofit competing with the Legacy Newsletter of the hospital next door, but your prospects’ mailboxes are full of so much junk that it levels the playing field. Come on. Do you really believe your prospects are dying to come home at night to read your newsletter describing how to part with their wealth and estates after their death? No wonder some claim that they believe their newsletters are getting a 1% readership rate (not response rate; readership).

You Bank Cash. Not Readership.

Your prospects will actually pay more attention to an advertising medium that delivers a quick, simple, focused message such as a planned giving postcard. One that is cleverly designed, cleverly delivered, and most especially one that is benefits-based. Today, postcards are an effective way to promote your program, cost less to produce, and definitely a smarter marketing strategy because the savings alone help you target your audience more often. And “this more often” is simply Marketing 101.

Remember: Americans read their mail standing over a wastebasket. A quick-read medium is essential. In fact, see why Tom Ahern calls the planned giving newsletter a death brochure in this post. In fact, read this PDF we published on death brochures and the planned giving newsletter several years ago. This is now more current than ever.

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