Your Enemy is an Overstuffed Mailbox

Have you ever wondered why your planned giving newsletters are not getting a good response?

Because chances are they are not even getting read.

The days of the traditional, “place-my-logo-and-name-at-the-top,” canned-content planned giving newsletters are over.  Prospects in the ‘60s may have responded to them, but not anymore — they have all passed away long since.

Does this mean you should totally avoid newsletters? Not at all. See here how you can make newsletters work better.

Marketing Noise

Every day the average prospect is inundated with over 2500 marketing messages. In a large city, it’s over 3700.

A battle is being fought for the eyes and ears of the world, and in most cases the worst enemy is an overstuffed mailbox. Not only is your mail competing with the legacy newsletter of the local hospital, but also with PetSmart, ValPak, hundreds of coupons from the grocery stores, and the Chevy dealer down the street.

Be realistic: Under these circumstances, do you really think your prospects will take the time — or have the patience — to read your four-page newsletter on how to part with their wealth after their death?

Smart Marketing

Today’s prospect will pay more attention to an advertising medium that delivers a quick, simple, focused message — one that is cleverly designed, clearly delivered, and most especially one that is benefits-based. Stay away from newsletters that focus on the features of planned gifts, because to the recipient they are “promoting death.”

You have many other, more effective options:

  • For example, first try a simple education/solicitation letter, three times a year, introducing the benefits of giving wisely (try not to use the words “planned giving” initially).
  • Second, use postcards. Postcards are far more effective than newsletters.
  • Third, carry your focused planned giving message in each and every publication your organization mails out. These can be in a column format (a lot of copy for columns at PlannedGiving.Net) or a display ad.

Remember: Americans today read their mail while standing over a wastebasket. Make sure your promotional pieces don’t end up there!

 

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